Latino/a/x Communities

FacebookTwitterGoogle ClassroomEmail
A group of children wearing backpacks run with enthusiasm outside at the close of the school day

Latino and Hispanic are terms often used interchangeably in the U.S., yet they mean different things. Hispanic relies on linguistic heritage and refers to those who speak Spanish and/or are descended from Spanish-speaking populations. Latino refers to those who may consider themselves of Latin American ancestries. Because Spanish — a language imposed by colonization of Indigenous peoples in what we now know as Latin America — is a gendered language, some use the term Latinx. This circumvents a binary choice (Latino vs. Latina, male vs. female) that excludes those who identify as gender fluid or nonbinary. Many identify by their country of origin or that of their ancestors, or by their specific Indigenous identities. The selections of PBS and PBS Wisconsin programming presented here express the diversity of this wide array of cultures, histories, and experiences that animate and enrich our communities.

Featured

POV

January 23, 2022

Team Meryland

In the projects of Watts, Meryland Gonzales, a twelve-year-old female boxer trains to be crowned the 2019 Junior Olympics champion. Meanwhile, her immigrant parents work tirelessly to give their child a shot at achieving her dreams.

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Watch Voces With PBS Passport

VOCES : Latino Vote: Dispatches from the BattlegroundPBS Wisconsin Passport

VOCES

Latino Vote: Dispatches from the Battleground

An inside look at the high-stakes effort to turn out the Latino vote in the 2020 election.

VOCES : The PushoutsPBS Wisconsin Passport

VOCES

The Pushouts

Meet Dr. Victor Rios a former gang member working with youth being “pushed out” of school.

VOCES : American ExilePBS Wisconsin Passport

VOCES

American Exile

Two brothers who fought in Vietnam are among thousands of veterans who are being deported.